» 
allemand anglais arabe bulgare chinois coréen croate danois espagnol estonien finnois français grec hébreu hindi hongrois islandais indonésien italien japonais letton lituanien malgache néerlandais norvégien persan polonais portugais roumain russe serbe slovaque slovène suédois tchèque thai turc vietnamien
allemand anglais arabe bulgare chinois coréen croate danois espagnol estonien finnois français grec hébreu hindi hongrois islandais indonésien italien japonais letton lituanien malgache néerlandais norvégien persan polonais portugais roumain russe serbe slovaque slovène suédois tchèque thai turc vietnamien

définition - Revolutionary_Road_(film)

voir la définition de Wikipedia

   Publicité ▼

Wikipedia

Revolutionary Road (film)

From Wikipedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Revolutionary Road

Original poster
Directed bySam Mendes
Produced byBobby Cohen
Sam Mendes
Scott Rudin
Sharan Kapoor
Written byNovel:
Richard Yates
Screenplay:
Justin Haythe
StarringLeonardo DiCaprio
Kate Winslet
Michael Shannon
Richard Easton
Jay O. Sanders
and Kathy Bates
Music byThomas Newman
CinematographyRoger Deakins
Editing byTariq Anwar
StudioDreamWorks Pictures
BBC Films
Distributed byParamount Vantage
Release date(s)December 26, 2008 (limited)
January 23, 2009 (wide)
Running time119 min.
CountryUnited States
United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Budget$35,000,000
Gross revenue$75,225,074[1]

Revolutionary Road is a 2008 British-American drama film directed by Sam Mendes and starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. The screenplay by Justin Haythe is based on the 1961 novel of the same name by Richard Yates. The film opened in limited release on December 26, 2008, and expanded wide on January 23, 2009. This is the first film in which DiCaprio and Winslet have co-starred since the 1997 Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox film, Titanic.

Contents

Synopsis

The movie begins at a house party, where Frank Wheeler (Leonardo DiCaprio) eyes April (Kate Winslet) from across the room. They go to the corner, introduce themselves and chat. She says she is learning to be an actress.

Next scene we jump immediately to the end of a play, as the curtain is about to come down. We see April on stage upset, and Frank in the audience with a huge frown on his face. Some people clap and cheer and some are really disappointed with the play, walking by Frank as they go on about how terrible it was. Mrs. Helen Givings (Kathy Bates) walks by and compliments Frank that his wife was terrific in the play. Frank smiles and walks away.

Frank goes to the backstage looking for April. On the way he sees Milly Campbell (Kathryn Hahn), who was also in the play. She tells Frank that her and her husband Shep (David Harbour) are ready for a drink. Frank agrees and goes to the private dressing room where he finds a devastated April changing. She asks Frank to tell Milly and Shep they cannot go out for a drink by using their nanny as an excuse. Frank and April argue a bit but Frank obliges. We then see a far shot of Frank and April leaving in the hallway of a high school with obvious distance between the two of them, not saying a word, even when they are in the car.

While driving, Frank turns and tells April that it wasn't her fault that the play was bad, it was because it was unprofessional with lousy scripts and amateur actors and actresses around her. Not only does April not appreciate his comments, she asks Frank not to talk about it. They argue some more and Frank pulls the car over. Frank tells April that it's not his fault the play sucked - he is being very supportive and he is not going to put up with anymore of the attitude she is giving him. April gets out of the car and Frank follows angrily. They scream at each other about how Frank is always trying to talk things out while all she wants to do is have peace and quiet to deal with it herself. The argument gets heated and April insults Frank about trying to be tough and manly. Frank makes a fist and looks like he is about to hit April but he controls his urge to hit her and starts to pound the hood of their car instead, hurting his hand. April tells Frank to take her home and gets in the car. They drive off.

Now the title Revolutionary Road comes to screen.

We see Frank getting ready to go to work. Dressed in a grey suit and a hat, he drives to the station and takes the train into the city. The setting is suburban Connecticut in the 1950s. We now see April stopping to stare at the neighborhood as she is taking out the trash. She flashes back to sitting in the car with Frank while Mrs. Givings, their realtor, is driving. Throughout the drive Mrs. Givings keeps mentioning how the two of them are so different from anyone else in the neighborhood. This is a recurring reference, people mentioning Frank and April Wheeler as the model couple of the town. They pull up to the house they eventually buy and we see how delighted April is with it. Flash back to present day.

Frank is within hundreds of other people heading to work - his face shows just how miserable he is with this everyday routine. While riding the elevator a cute young secretary gives him a glance which puts a smile on Franks face. On his way to his cubicle Frank trades pleasantries and miseries with his coworkers. He is called into the boss' office for a discussion regarding a bad job he did. (We realize Frank works in Knox as a salesperson like his dad did all his life.) He is ticked at being yelled at by his boss so he revises his work with a mediocre, joking attitude that could very well cost him his job. Frank then goes to the cute secretary he saw in the elevator earlier and asks her to type the revised edition for him and asks her out for lunch. During lunch they drink martinis and he calls the office to tell them that he needs the secretary for the day to help him do research. After he hangs up they both laugh. During their conversation, Frank tells the secretary a joke; the joke is that his dad worked all his life at the same company as a salesperson and he thinks that he was the most miserable man he has ever known and swore he would never be like him. Here it is years later and he is doing the exact same job his dad did all his life. To top that off, today is his 30th birthday and he is miserable.

Frank takes the secretary to a hotel where they have sex. He then leaves the hotel in a hurry with a very casual good bye, leaving the secretary feeling used. Frank gets home and is greeted with a kiss by a dressed up April. He is then surprised with a birthday cake by April, their son Michael (Ty Simpkins) and their daughter Jennifer (Ryan Simpkins) who sing Happy Birthday to him which bring tears of joy to his eyes.

Around this time of the movie April is flipping through old pictures and finds a picture of Frank and his buddies standing in front of the Eiffel Tower. April has a flashback of the first night she slept with Frank when he told her if he has a choice he would live in Paris where people actually have lives. April tells him that he is the most interesting person she has ever met.

At night after a shower, April asks to talk to Frank. She proposes the idea that between their savings and selling their house they would have enough money to survive without work for six months and wants them to move to Paris. She believes that they pay secretaries so well that Frank can finally have the time to enjoy his life and all and all they can get away from this misery they are in right now. At first Frank just laughs off the idea but then begins to buy into it. They agree and hug.

They break the news to their friends Shep and Milly Campbell who are shocked but supportive as Frank and April are so serious and so convincing of how their lives in Paris would be. At night, Shep and Milly laugh at this idea but Milly also cries, maybe at the notion of friends leaving or that the friends are on to better lives then theirs.

April invites Mr. and Mrs. Givings and their troubled son John (Michael Shannon), who currently resides in a psychiatric ward, to a gathering. Which is actually a favor to Mrs. Givings, who believes that meeting the perfect couple will do her son good. John is a very blunt man and has no sense of manners at all. Frank and April are patient and loving to allow John to ridicule everything they have to say. Frank and April mention they are leaving their lives here and starting a new one in Paris. This causes John to laugh at everything his mother believed, that the perfect couple couldn't even stand this place. Frank and April ask John to go for a walk with them afterward.

During the walk, Frank and April learn that John gets electrocuted constantly for his mental problems, and in some ways, they bond during the talk. John asks why they are leaving here and Franks answer was to leave this place of helplessness. John agrees and says it takes a wise man to see it, but a brave man to admit this sense of helplessness.

In the next couple of weeks the Wheelers are preparing for their new lives; April gets their visas and all of their traveling documents taken care of and Frank continues going to work but with so much more joy. They seem to be happier now, no more arguments and definitely very loving.

Frank is called into the boss' office one morning with the chief executive inside as well. Frank is so sure he is going to get fired, which he couldn't care less about, for the mediocre work he did a couple of weeks ago. Turns out his mediocre work hit the jackpot and got great reviews within the company which leads them to offer Frank a promotion working with the chief executive on a new project: computers.

Frank doesn't take the job yet, nor does he mention it to April. They are so happy that they are taking this step at a new life that they make love right there in the kitchen.

After a while the chief executive calls Frank in for a fancy dinner to talk about the promotion. The chief executive really wants Frank in and he is tempted but not fully willing to take the job. Frank asks if he knows his father, who worked at the company for 30 years, the chief said no. The chief tells him that a man only gets a couple of chances in life so when the opportunity comes, he better grab onto to it as tight as possible because there just might not be another one coming. This gets Frank thinking.

Later, April tells Frank that she is 10 weeks pregnant and they both are worried. She says there are options as long as it is before the 12th week.They agree that a child would not be an option for them to take to Paris as it changes the whole plan. Frank is not supportive of the idea of abortion, maybe because he is tempted by the promotion.

Next we see the Wheelers and the Campbells at the beach enjoying the sunshine and the water. Frank, knowing April can hear the conversation, speaks loudly to Shep about what a great opportunity it is and how much more money he is being offered for the promotion. April notices Frank is starting to lean away from their idea of a new life in Paris and they argue at the beach - Frank jumps into the water to cool off.

At night while they argue some more Frank goes to the restroom and as he is getting a towel he notices an abortion kit on the shelf. He is furious and starts to scream at April. During the argument she mentions that the reason they moved here was because of an unplanned pregnancy and that she doesn't want them to decide another part of their lives for the same reason. She said she has no plans to use the kit for sure but she got it just in case. They argued some more and April understands that Paris is no longer an option.

The next day Frank takes the promotion and while staying late, goes out with the young secretary again.

Another night Frank, April, Milly and Shep go out dancing. Milly and Shep are happy that the Paris trip is not going to happen, everyone is happy except for April. Frank asks April to dance but April says no so he dances with Milly instead. At the end of the night when they are leaving their cars are blocked in so since both of their nannies are waiting, April stays with Shep to wait for the car to be moved while Frank takes Milly home to relieve the nannies. April and Shep go back into the bar and start to dance with a lot of flirting and implications which leads to them having sex in his car. Shep tells April that he loves her and April tells him to not talk.

The next day Frank sees how unhappy April is and worries that they haven't slept on the same bed ever since the Paris trip got canceled. He decides to tell April how much he loves her and how he wants to make her happy here at home. He goes so far as to tell her that he had an affair but he ended it. April was not even mad hearing it. She said she feels nothing, because she no longer loves him. Just then, Mrs. Givings stops by along with her husband and her son John. As they eat dinner they mention that Paris is no longer an option and that April is going to have a baby. This gets John upset so he starts to insult Frank and April saying that he is not a man anymore because he is eating his own words about the helplessness and all that. Frank starts to get mad and impatient while John goes on to say Frank only feels like a man because he knocked April up. This gets the Givings kicked out of the house, and on the way out, John jokingly apologizes but said he is happy about one thing, that he is not that kid that is going to be born into this miserable family.

When the Givings leave, April and Frank get into another heated argument. Frank is so emotional and angry that he slams the door, punches the wall, throws lamps, breaks chairs and is completely out of control. April says that if Frank touches her she will scream, Frank holds her hand and she screams and runs out of the house. Frank chases after her into the woods.

April tells Frank to leave her alone, that she doesn't want to talk things out; she just wants to be alone to think it through. Frank complies and leaves her in the woods. While in the house, Frank sits in a chair in the living room, drinking and worrying for April and her safety but when she comes back she does not come into the house, she just keeps smoking right outside the door while Frank stays in the house with the lights off.

The next morning Frank is ready to go to work and he sees a beautiful and 'rejuvenated' April preparing breakfast, asking Frank politely how he wants his eggs. Frank is caught off guard but is relieved that the whole drama is done and they go on to have breakfast. During breakfast, he talks about his work and the new computer to April who appears interested at every word he has to say but is faking it. They have an awkward goodbye at the door with a fake kiss and smile from April. Frank asks if she still loves him and she replied with an unsettling yes. Frank, still feeling unsure, leaves in his car.

Back in the house, April cries while doing the dishes. She calls the nanny to ask her to tell her children that she loves them very much. She boils a pot of water and lays down some towels on the bathroom floor while she holds the abortion kit in her hand as she closes the door. We then see April gently walk down the stairs to the living room where she looks out the window; she bleeds all over the carpet and her skirt then calls the ambulance.

At the hospital, Frank is worried and crying while Shep comforts him. He talks about broken capillaries and other stuff the doctor told him that he couldn't understand. He finishes with, "she did it to her herself". Shep leaves to get coffee and he cries at the vending machine and when he returns he gets the news that April did not make it because she bled out too much even before the ambulance got to her.

Frank runs down the street.

The next scene we see Milly and Shep with a new couple in their house and they are sharing this tragic story of the Wheelers. Milly mentions that Frank moved back into the city with the kids and he was the most devoted father there is, spending all his time with his kids. Shep walks out to the backyard and Milly follows suit. Shep tells Milly that he no longer wants to talk about the Wheelers and she says okay. They hug and kiss and walk back inside the house.

We see a scene of Frank sitting on a park bench watching his children on the swings. Frank just smiles when the kids call him, but he seemed very regretful.

In the final scene Mrs. Givings is sitting on the couch talking to her husband Howard (Richard Easton). She talks about the neighborhood and what it has become. When Howard mentions the Wheelers, Mrs. Givings goes on and on about how crazy and dysfunctional they were despite their looks. As she is going on and on about it, he begins to turn down his hearing aid as it is the only way he has learned to keep himself sane from living with a woman like Mrs. Givings.

Principal cast

Development

After Richard Yates' novel was published in 1961, director John Frankenheimer considered filming it, but opted to make The Manchurian Candidate instead.[2] Samuel Goldwyn Jr., expressed an interest in making it into a film but others in his studio convinced him that it lacked commercial prospects.[3] In 1965, producer Albert Ruddy bought the rights but did not like the book's ending, and wanted to obscure April's death with "tricky camerawork".[3] He became involved in adapting The Godfather and, five years later, while a writer-in-residence at Wichita State University, Yates offered to adapt his work for the screen. Ruddy had other projects lined up at the time and demurred, eventually selling the rights to actor Patrick O'Neal. The actor loved the book and spent the rest of his life trying to finish a workable screenplay.[3] Yates read O'Neal's treatment of his novel and found it "godawful", but O'Neal refused the writer's repeated offers to buy back the rights. Yates died in 1992, O'Neal two years later.[2]

The project remained in limbo until 2001 when Todd Field expressed interest in adapting it for the screen. However, when told by the O'Neal estate he would be required to shoot O'Neal's script as written, Field stepped away from the material and opted to make Little Children instead.[4] David Thompson eventually purchased the rights for BBC Films.[5] In March 2007, BBC Films established a partnership with DreamWorks, and the rights to the film's worldwide distribution were assigned to Paramount Pictures, owner of DreamWorks. On February 14, 2008, Paramount announced that Paramount Vantage was "taking over distribution duties on Revolutionary Road".[6] The BBC hired Justin Haythe to write the screenplay because, according to the screenwriter, he was "hugely affordable".[3]

Kate Winslet sent producer Scott Rudin the script and he told her that her husband, director Sam Mendes, would be perfect to direct it.[3] She gave Mendes Yates' novel and told him, "I really want to play this part".[7] He read Haythe's script and then the book in quick succession. Haythe's first draft was very faithful to the novel, using large parts of Yates' own language, but Mendes told him to find ways to externalize what Frank and April do not say to each other.[3]

Once Leonardo DiCaprio agreed to do the film, it went almost immediately into production.[3] DiCaprio said that he saw his character as "unheroic" and "slightly cowardly" and that he was "willing to be just a product of his environment".[8] DiCaprio prepared for the role by watching several documentaries about the 1950s and the origin of suburbs. He said that the film was not meant to be a romance and that he and Winslet intentionally avoided films that show them in romantic roles since Titanic.[8] Both actors were reluctant to make films similar to Titanic because "we just knew it would be a fundamental mistake to try to repeat any of those themes".[9] To prepare for the role, Winslet read The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan.[10]

Mendes had the cast rehearse for three-and-a-half weeks before principal photography and shot everything in sequence and on location.[11] Actor Michael Shannon said that he did not feel that on the set of the film there were any stars, but "a group of people united by a passion for the material and wanting to honor the book".[12] He said that Winslet and DiCaprio could only make such a good performance as a couple, because they had developed a friendship since their work on Titanic. For Shannon, it was more important to prepare for the moment when he walked on the set than being concerned about the movie stars he was working with.[12] On the fight scenes between him and Winslet, DiCaprio said, "So much of what happens between Frank and April in this film is what's left unsaid. I actually found it a real joy to do those fight scenes because finally, these people were letting each other have it."[9] The shoot was so emotionally and physically exhausting for DiCaprio that he postponed his next film for two months.[11]

Mendes wanted to create a claustrophobic dynamic and shot all of the Wheeler house interiors in an actual house in Darien, Connecticut. DiCaprio remembers, "it was many months in this house and there was no escaping the environment. I think it fed into the performances."[13] They could not film in a period accurate house because it would have been too small to shoot inside.[14] Production Designer Kristi Zea is responsible for the "iconic, nostalgic images of quaint Americana", although she says that was "absolutely the antithesis of what we wanted to do".[14] Zea chose for the set of this film furnishings that "that middle-class America would be buying at that time".[14]

During the post-production phase, Mendes cut 18 scenes, or 20 minutes to achieve a less literal version that he saw as more in the spirit of Yates' novel.[3]

Reaction

Revolutionary Road had a limited release in the United States at three theaters on December 26, 2008, and a wide release at 1,058 theaters on January 23, 2009. Revolutionary Road has earned $22.9 million at the domestic box office and $51.7 million internationally for a worldwide total of $74.6 million.[15]

Critical reception

Revolutionary Road has received generally positive reviews from critics. It holds a 69% rating from critics on review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 190 reviews, with the consensus being "Brilliantly acted and emotionally powerful, Revolutionary Road is a handsome adaptation of Richard Yates' celebrated novel".[16] Metacritic lists it with a 69 out of 100, which indicates "generally favorable reviews", based on 38 reviews.[17]

Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times said,

It takes the skill of stars Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio and director Sam Mendes to get this film to a place where it involves and moves us — which it finally does — but it is a near thing... Justin Haythe's screenplay does many good things, but it can't escape the arch lingo of the time... and that in turn makes the film's concerns initially feel dated and outmoded as well... Encouraged by Mendes' artful direction, his gift for eliciting naturalness, the core of this film finally cries out to us today, makes us see that the notion of characters struggling with life, with the despair of betraying their best selves because of what society will or won't allow, is as gripping and relevant now as it ever was. Or ever will be.[18]

Joe Neumaier of the New York Daily News said

[the film] comes close but falls short of capturing Richard Yates' terrific novel... the movie — two-thirds Mad Men, one-third American Beauty, with a John Cheever chaser — works best when focusing on the personal. Thankfully, it's there that Mendes and screenwriter Justin Haythe catch some of Yates' weighty ideas, and where Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet succeed in doing the heavy lifting... DiCaprio, round-shouldered and sleepy-eyed, and Winslet, watchful and alert, raise up each other and everything around them. Never once shadowed by Titanic, they suggest, often wordlessly, the box the Wheelers have found themselves in. Whereas the novel is told mostly from Frank's viewpoint, the movie is just as much April's, and Winslet, whether fighting back or fighting back tears, is sensational.[19]

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave Revolutionary Road four stars out of four, commending the acting and screenplay and calling the film "so good it is devastating". He said of Winslet and DiCaprio, "[t]hey are so good, they stop being actors and become the people I grew up around."[20]

Todd McCarthy of Variety called the film "faithful, intelligent, admirably acted, superbly shot" and added, "It also offers a near-perfect case study of the ways in which film is incapable of capturing certain crucial literary qualities, in this case the very things that elevate the book from being a merely insightful study of a deteriorating marriage into a remarkable one... Even when the dramatic temperature is cranked up to high, the picture's underpinnings seem only partly present, to the point where one suspects that what it's reaching for dramatically might be all but unattainable — perhaps approachable only by Pinter at his peak."[21] McCarthy later significantly qualified his review, calling Revolutionary Road "problematic" and that it "has some issues that just won't go away".[22] He concludes that Revolutionary Road suffers in comparison to Billy Wilder's The Apartment and Richard Quine's Strangers When We Meet because of its "narrow vision", even arguing that the television series Mad Men handles the issues of conformity, frustration, and hypocrisy "with more panache and precision".[22]

David Ansen of Newsweek said the film "is lushly, impeccably mounted — perhaps too much so. Mendes, a superb stage director, has an innately theatrical style: everything pops off the screen a little bigger and bolder than life, but the effect, rather than intensifying the emotions, calls attention to itself. Instead of losing myself in the story, I often felt on the outside looking in, appreciating the craftsmanship, but one step removed from the agony on display. Revolutionary Road is impressive, but it feels like a classic encased in amber."[23]

Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly graded the film B+ and commented,

The film is lavishly dark — some might say too dark — yet I'd suggest it has a different limitation: For all its shattering domestic discord, there's something remote and aestheticized about it. April brings a private well of conflict to her middle-class prison, but Winslet is so meticulous in her telegraphed despair that she intrigues us, moves us, yet never quite touches our unguarded nerves.[24]

Kirk Honeycutt of The Hollywood Reporter called the film a "didactic, emotionally overblown critique of the soulless suburbs" and added, "Revolutionary Road is, essentially, a repeat for Mendes of American Beauty... Once more, the suburbs are well-upholstered nightmares and its denizens clueless — other than one estranged male. Clearly, this environment attracts the dramatic sensibilities of this theater-trained director. Everything is boldly indicated to the audience from arch acting styles to the wink-wink, nod-nod of its design. Indeed his actors play the subtext with such fury that the text virtually disappears. Subtlety is not one of Mendes' strong suits."[25]

Rex Reed of The New York Observer called the film "a flawless, moment-to-moment autopsy of a marriage on the rocks and an indictment of the American Dream gone sour" and "a profound, intelligent and deeply heartfelt work that raises the bar of filmmaking to exhilarating."[26]

Peter Travers of Rolling Stone called the film "raw and riveting" and commented, "Directed with extraordinary skill by Sam Mendes, who warms the chill in the Yates-faithful script by Justin Haythe, the film is a tough road well worth traveling . . . DiCaprio is in peak form, bringing layers of buried emotion to a defeated man. And the glorious Winslet defines what makes an actress great, blazing commitment to a character and the range to make every nuance felt."[27]

Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle voted the film as his best of 2008. He commented, "Finally, this is a movie that can and should be seen more than once. Watch it one time through her eyes. Watch it again through his eyes. It works both ways. It works in every way. This is a great American film."[28]

Top ten lists

The film appeared on several critics' top ten lists of the best films of 2008.[29]

Awards and nominations

  • By missing out on an Academy Award nomination, Kate Winslet became only the second actress to win the Golden Globe for Best Lead Actress in a Drama without receiving a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress for the same role. Due to the difference in rules between the Golden Globes and Academy Awards, Winslet's performance in The Reader was considered a leading one by The Academy, despite winning the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for the same performance. According to Academy rules, an actor or actress may receive only one nomination in a single category. Due to Winslet's performance in The Reader being nominated, her performance in this film became ineligible.
Awards
AwardCategoryRecipient(s)Outcome
Academy AwardsBest Art DirectionDebra Schutt and Kristi Zeanominated
Best Costume DesignAlbert Wolskynominated
Best Supporting ActorMichael Shannonnominated
BAFTA AwardsBest ActressKate Winsletnominated
Best Costume DesignAlbert Wolskynominated
Best Production DesignDebra Schutt and Kristi Zeanominated
Best Screenplay – AdaptedJustin Haythenominated
Costume Designers GuildExcellence in Period Costume DesignAlbert Wolskynominated
Golden Globe AwardsBest Motion Picture – Dramanominated
Best Actor – Motion Picture DramaLeonardo DiCaprionominated
Best Actress – Motion Picture DramaKate Winsletwon
Best Director – Motion PictureSam Mendesnominated
Screen Actors GuildOutstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role – Motion PictureKate Winsletnominated
Satellite AwardsTop 10 Films of 2008won
Best Art Direction and Production DesignKristi Zea, Teresa Carriker-Thayer, John Kasarda, and Nicholas Lundynominated
Best Film – Dramanominated
Best Actor – Motion Picture DramaLeonardo DiCaprionominated
Best Screenplay – AdaptedJustin Haythenominated
Best Supporting Actor – Motion PictureMichael Shannonwon
St. Louis Gateway Film Critics AssociationBest ActressKate Winsletwon
Vancouver Film Critics CircleBest ActressKate Winslet
(for Revolutionary Road and The Reader)
won

DVD Release

Revolutionary Road was released in the Region 1 (US and Canada) area on June 2, 2009. Entertainment Weekly gave the DVD an "A-" rating and felt that director Sam Mendes gave an "insightful" audio commentary.[30]

The DVD includes deleted scenes which give more depth in clarity to the theme and the characters. They include a flashback of April's to the time when the couple decides to buy the house on Revolutionary Road. The scene shows a pregnant April and Frank being very loving towards each other. They stand for the first time in front of the picture window and April comments that "there's no escaping the picture window." Frank comments that one picture window won't ruin their personalities. This is the same window she stands in front of after the abortion in the final scene and, as the director puts it, becomes a symbol of her entrapment. Another scene shows April mowing the lawn the morning after their fight on the side of the road. Frank comes out and says she doesn't need to mow the lawn and then gives a halfway sincere apology about last night, but April isn't fully willing to accept it. Another scene shows Frank riding the train to work and having a flashback to his childhood and riding on the train with his father to his work. His father comments that he's going to be a big shot now. Another scene shows Frank and April at Shep's house with him and his wife having drinks. Frank comments that tomorrow is going to be his 30th birthday. He then recalls a story of being in the war where he loses all track of the date and while everyone is laying down to sleep he remembers that it's his birthday. Everyone in his battalion sings him Happy Birthday. April looks at him with pity and when Frank asks her why she says that he told that story last year. In the final deleted scene Frank is shown running into the house after he finds out April has died. It is night time and he goes upstairs and discovers the bathtub where the abortion is shown although the actual bathtub is not shown. Shep then comes in the house and calls his name and begins looking for him, but Frank hides behind the door and isn't discovered. Shep leaves and Frank wanders downstairs and discovers a note from April on the table. It reads, "Whatever happens, don't blame yourself. I love you." Frank reads it and begins to cry.

Trivia

  • As earlier stated, the film stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, and Kathy Bates who were all cast together in the 1997 film, Titanic.

References

  1. Revolutionary Road Box Office Mojo
  2. 2.0 2.1 Bailey, Blake (June 26, 2007). "Revolutionary Road—The Movie". Slate. http://www.slate.com/id/2169033/. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 3.6 3.7 McGrath, Charles (December 14, 2008). "Kate! Leo! Gloom! Doom! Can It Work?". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/14/movies/14mcgr.html?_r=1&ref=arts. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  4. "Trivia." Revolutionary Road at IMBD.com.
  5. McClintock, Pamela (March 22, 2007). "DiCaprio, Winslet to Star in Road". Variety. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117961661.html?categoryid=13&cs=1. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  6. "New Dates for Eight Under Par". The Hollywood Reporter. February 14, 2008. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117961661.html?categoryid=13&cs=1. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  7. Knegt, Peter (December 22, 2008). "Plumbing the Depths of Revolutionary Road: Sam Mendes on Yates, Kate, and the Pressures of Awards". indieWIRE. http://www.indiewire.com/article/plumbing_the_depths_of_revolutionary_road_sam_mendes_on_yates_kate_and_the_/. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 Guzman, Rafer (January 19, 2009). "In Revolutionary Road, Leo DiCaprio just an ordinary guy". Slate. http://www.pantagraph.com/articles/2009/01/13/freetime/doc495e5291d4cc4738928405.txt. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  9. 9.0 9.1 Wong, Grace (January 23, 2009). "DiCaprio reveals joys of fighting with Winslet". CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/23/kate.leo/index.html?section=cnn_latest. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  10. Cochrane, Kira (December 19, 2008). ""I did have moments where I'd say, Oh my God ..."". The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2008/dec/19/kate-winslet-film-the-reader-revolutionary-road. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  11. 11.0 11.1 Wood, Gaby (December 14, 2008). "How Sam became The Man". The Observer. http://www.observer.com/2008/o2/can-love-survive?page=all. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  12. 12.0 12.1 Copley, Rich (January 22, 2009). "Michael Shannon's small part in Revolutionary Road made a big impact". The State. http://www.thestate.com/movies/story/659963.html?RSS=life_and_style. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  13. Masterson, Lawrie (January 11, 2009). "Leonardo DiCaprio's Hard Road". Herald Sun. 
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 Hillis, Aaron (January 6, 2009). "Revolutionary Road - Evoke an era of suburban life without overdoing it". Variety. http://www.variety.com/index.asp?layout=print_story&articleid=VR1117998049&categoryid=3247. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  15. "Revolutionary Road". Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=revolutionaryroad.htm. Retrieved 2009-05-24. 
  16. "Revolutionary Road Movie Reviews, Pictures". Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/revolutionary_road/. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  17. "Revolutionary Road (2008): Reviews". Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/revolutionaryroad. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  18. Turan, Kenneth. "'Revolutionary Road': Strong Performances Steer This 1950s Marital Drama Out of a Period-Picture Trap." Los Angeles Times. December 26, 2008.
  19. Neumaier, Joe. "Revolutionary Road: Beauty is in the Details of Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet's Reunion Movie 'Revolutionary Road'." New York Daily News. December 24, 2008.
  20. Roger Ebert (2008-12-30). "Revolutionary Road (R)". rogerebert.com. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081230/REVIEWS/812309997. Retrieved 2009-01-23. 
  21. McCarthy, Todd. "Revolutionary Road." Variety. November 17, 2008.
  22. 22.0 22.1 McCarthy, Todd. "'50s Melodrama Hard to Capture on Film," Variety. January 8, 2009.
  23. Ansen, David. "Revolutionary Road." Newsweek. November 28, 2008.
  24. Gleiberman, Owen. "Revolutionary Road." Entertainment Weekly. November 28, 2008.
  25. Honeycutt, Kirk. "Film Review: Revolutionary Road." The Hollywood Reporter. November 17, 2008.
  26. Reed, Rex. "Love Asunder." New York Observer. December 16, 2008.
  27. Travers, Peter. "Revolutionary Road." Rolling Stone. December 25, 2008.
  28. LaSalle, Mick. "Movie Review: 'Revolutionary Road' Year's Best." San Francisco Chronicle. January 2, 2009.
  29. 29.0 29.1 29.2 29.3 29.4 29.5 29.6 29.7 "Metacritic: 2008 Film Critic Top Ten Lists". Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/awards/2008/toptens.shtml. Retrieved January 11, 2009. 
  30. Nashawaty, Chris (May 27, 2009). "Revolutionary Road". Entertainment Weekly. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20281259,00.html. Retrieved 2009-07-16. 

External links

Revolutionary Road (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
Revolutionary Road

Original poster
Directed bySam Mendes
Produced byBobby Cohen
Sam Mendes
Scott Rudin
Sharan Kapoor
Written byNovel:
Richard Yates
Screenplay:
Justin Haythe
StarringLeonardo DiCaprio
Kate Winslet
Michael Shannon
Richard Easton
Jay O. Sanders
and Kathy Bates
Music byThomas Newman
CinematographyRoger Deakins
Editing byTariq Anwar
StudioDreamWorks Pictures
BBC Films
Distributed byParamount Vantage
Release date(s)December 26, 2008 (limited)
January 23, 2009 (wide)
Running time119 min.
CountryUnited States
United Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Budget$35,000,000
Gross revenue$75,225,074[1]

Revolutionary Road is a 2008 British-American drama film directed by Sam Mendes and starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. The screenplay by Justin Haythe is based on the 1961 novel of the same name by Richard Yates. The film opened in limited release on December 26, 2008, and expanded wide on January 23, 2009. This is the first film in which DiCaprio and Winslet have co-starred since the 1997 Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox film, Titanic.

Contents

Synopsis

The movie begins at a house party, where Frank Wheeler (Leonardo DiCaprio) eyes April (Kate Winslet) from across the room. They go to the corner, introduce themselves and chat. She says she is learning to be an actress.

Next scene we jump immediately to the end of a play, as the curtain is about to come down. We see April on stage upset, and Frank in the audience with a huge frown on his face. Some people clap and cheer and some are really disappointed with the play, walking by Frank as they go on about how terrible it was. Mrs. Helen Givings (Kathy Bates) walks by and compliments Frank that his wife was terrific in the play. Frank smiles and walks away.

Frank goes to the backstage looking for April. On the way he sees Milly Campbell (Kathryn Hahn), who was also in the play. She tells Frank that her and her husband Shep (David Harbour) are ready for a drink. Frank agrees and goes to the private dressing room where he finds a devastated April changing. She asks Frank to tell Milly and Shep they cannot go out for a drink by using their nanny as an excuse. Frank and April argue a bit but Frank obliges. We then see a far shot of Frank and April leaving in the hallway of a high school with obvious distance between the two of them, not saying a word, even when they are in the car.

While driving, Frank turns and tells April that it wasn't her fault that the play was bad, it was because it was unprofessional with lousy scripts and amateur actors and actresses around her. Not only does April not appreciate his comments, she asks Frank not to talk about it. They argue some more and Frank pulls the car over. Frank tells April that it's not his fault the play sucked - he is being very supportive and he is not going to put up with anymore of the attitude she is giving him. April gets out of the car and Frank follows angrily. They scream at each other about how Frank is always trying to talk things out while all she wants to do is have peace and quiet to deal with it herself. The argument gets heated and April insults Frank about trying to be tough and manly. Frank makes a fist and looks like he is about to hit April but he controls his urge to hit her and starts to pound the hood of their car instead, hurting his hand. April tells Frank to take her home and gets in the car. They drive off.

Now the title Revolutionary Road comes to screen.

We see Frank getting ready to go to work. Dressed in a grey suit and a hat, he drives to the station and takes the train into the city. The setting is suburban Connecticut in the 1950s. We now see April stopping to stare at the neighborhood as she is taking out the trash. She flashes back to sitting in the car with Frank while Mrs. Givings, their realtor, is driving. Throughout the drive Mrs. Givings keeps mentioning how the two of them are so different from anyone else in the neighborhood. This is a recurring reference, people mentioning Frank and April Wheeler as the model couple of the town. They pull up to the house they eventually buy and we see how delighted April is with it. Flash back to present day.

Frank is within hundreds of other people heading to work - his face shows just how miserable he is with this everyday routine. While riding the elevator a cute young secretary gives him a glance which puts a smile on Franks face. On his way to his cubicle Frank trades pleasantries and miseries with his coworkers. He is called into the boss' office for a discussion regarding a bad job he did. (We realize Frank works in Knox as a salesperson like his dad did all his life.) He is ticked at being yelled at by his boss so he revises his work with a mediocre, joking attitude that could very well cost him his job. Frank then goes to the cute secretary he saw in the elevator earlier and asks her to type the revised edition for him and asks her out for lunch. During lunch they drink martinis and he calls the office to tell them that he needs the secretary for the day to help him do research. After he hangs up they both laugh. During their conversation, Frank tells the secretary a joke; the joke is that his dad worked all his life at the same company as a salesperson and he thinks that he was the most miserable man he has ever known and swore he would never be like him. Here it is years later and he is doing the exact same job his dad did all his life. To top that off, today is his 30th birthday and he is miserable.

Frank takes the secretary to a hotel where they have sex. He then leaves the hotel in a hurry with a very casual good bye, leaving the secretary feeling used. Frank gets home and is greeted with a kiss by a dressed up April. He is then surprised with a birthday cake by April, their son Michael (Ty Simpkins) and their daughter Jennifer (Ryan Simpkins) who sing Happy Birthday to him which bring tears of joy to his eyes.

Around this time of the movie April is flipping through old pictures and finds a picture of Frank and his buddies standing in front of the Eiffel Tower. April has a flashback of the first night she slept with Frank when he told her if he has a choice he would live in Paris where people actually have lives. April tells him that he is the most interesting person she has ever met.

At night after a shower, April asks to talk to Frank. She proposes the idea that between their savings and selling their house they would have enough money to survive without work for six months and wants them to move to Paris. She believes that they pay secretaries so well that Frank can finally have the time to enjoy his life and all and all they can get away from this misery they are in right now. At first Frank just laughs off the idea but then begins to buy into it. They agree and hug.

They break the news to their friends Shep and Milly Campbell who are shocked but supportive as Frank and April are so serious and so convincing of how their lives in Paris would be. At night, Shep and Milly laugh at this idea but Milly also cries, maybe at the notion of friends leaving or that the friends are on to better lives then theirs.

April invites Mr. and Mrs. Givings and their troubled son John (Michael Shannon), who currently resides in a psychiatric ward, to a gathering. Which is actually a favor to Mrs. Givings, who believes that meeting the perfect couple will do her son good. John is a very blunt man and has no sense of manners at all. Frank and April are patient and loving to allow John to ridicule everything they have to say. Frank and April mention they are leaving their lives here and starting a new one in Paris. This causes John to laugh at everything his mother believed, that the perfect couple couldn't even stand this place. Frank and April ask John to go for a walk with them afterward.

During the walk, Frank and April learn that John gets electrocuted constantly for his mental problems, and in some ways, they bond during the talk. John asks why they are leaving here and Franks answer was to leave this place of helplessness. John agrees and says it takes a wise man to see it, but a brave man to admit this sense of helplessness.

In the next couple of weeks the Wheelers are preparing for their new lives; April gets their visas and all of their traveling documents taken care of and Frank continues going to work but with so much more joy. They seem to be happier now, no more arguments and definitely very loving.

Frank is called into the boss' office one morning with the chief executive inside as well. Frank is so sure he is going to get fired, which he couldn't care less about, for the mediocre work he did a couple of weeks ago. Turns out his mediocre work hit the jackpot and got great reviews within the company which leads them to offer Frank a promotion working with the chief executive on a new project: computers.

Frank doesn't take the job yet, nor does he mention it to April. They are so happy that they are taking this step at a new life that they make love right there in the kitchen.

After a while the chief executive calls Frank in for a fancy dinner to talk about the promotion. The chief executive really wants Frank in and he is tempted but not fully willing to take the job. Frank asks if he knows his father, who worked at the company for 30 years, the chief said no. The chief tells him that a man only gets a couple of chances in life so when the opportunity comes, he better grab onto to it as tight as possible because there just might not be another one coming. This gets Frank thinking.

Later, April tells Frank that she is 10 weeks pregnant and they both are worried. She says there are options as long as it is before the 12th week.They agree that a child would not be an option for them to take to Paris as it changes the whole plan. Frank is not supportive of the idea of abortion, maybe because he is tempted by the promotion.

Next we see the Wheelers and the Campbells at the beach enjoying the sunshine and the water. Frank, knowing April can hear the conversation, speaks loudly to Shep about what a great opportunity it is and how much more money he is being offered for the promotion. April notices Frank is starting to lean away from their idea of a new life in Paris and they argue at the beach - Frank jumps into the water to cool off.

At night while they argue some more Frank goes to the restroom and as he is getting a towel he notices an abortion kit on the shelf. He is furious and starts to scream at April. During the argument she mentions that the reason they moved here was because of an unplanned pregnancy and that she doesn't want them to decide another part of their lives for the same reason. She said she has no plans to use the kit for sure but she got it just in case. They argued some more and April understands that Paris is no longer an option.

The next day Frank takes the promotion and while staying late, goes out with the young secretary again.

Another night Frank, April, Milly and Shep go out dancing. Milly and Shep are happy that the Paris trip is not going to happen, everyone is happy except for April. Frank asks April to dance but April says no so he dances with Milly instead. At the end of the night when they are leaving their cars are blocked in so since both of their nannies are waiting, April stays with Shep to wait for the car to be moved while Frank takes Milly home to relieve the nannies. April and Shep go back into the bar and start to dance with a lot of flirting and implications which leads to them having sex in his car. Shep tells April that he loves her and April tells him to not talk.

The next day Frank sees how unhappy April is and worries that they haven't slept on the same bed ever since the Paris trip got canceled. He decides to tell April how much he loves her and how he wants to make her happy here at home. He goes so far as to tell her that he had an affair but he ended it. April was not even mad hearing it. She said she feels nothing, because she no longer loves him. Just then, Mrs. Givings stops by along with her husband and her son John. As they eat dinner they mention that Paris is no longer an option and that April is going to have a baby. This gets John upset so he starts to insult Frank and April saying that he is not a man anymore because he is eating his own words about the helplessness and all that. Frank starts to get mad and impatient while John goes on to say Frank only feels like a man because he knocked April up. This gets the Givings kicked out of the house, and on the way out, John jokingly apologizes but said he is happy about one thing, that he is not that kid that is going to be born into this miserable family.

When the Givings leave, April and Frank get into another heated argument. Frank is so emotional and angry that he slams the door, punches the wall, throws lamps, breaks chairs and is completely out of control. April says that if Frank touches her she will scream, Frank holds her hand and she screams and runs out of the house. Frank chases after her into the woods.

April tells Frank to leave her alone, that she doesn't want to talk things out; she just wants to be alone to think it through. Frank complies and leaves her in the woods. While in the house, Frank sits in a chair in the living room, drinking and worrying for April and her safety but when she comes back she does not come into the house, she just keeps smoking right outside the door while Frank stays in the house with the lights off.

The next morning Frank is ready to go to work and he sees a beautiful and 'rejuvenated' April preparing breakfast, asking Frank politely how he wants his eggs. Frank is caught off guard but is relieved that the whole drama is done and they go on to have breakfast. During breakfast, he talks about his work and the new computer to April who appears interested at every word he has to say but is faking it. They have an awkward goodbye at the door with a fake kiss and smile from April. Frank asks if she still loves him and she replied with an unsettling yes. Frank, still feeling unsure, leaves in his car.

Back in the house, April cries while doing the dishes. She calls the nanny to ask her to tell her children that she loves them very much. She boils a pot of water and lays down some towels on the bathroom floor while she holds the abortion kit in her hand as she closes the door. We then see April gently walk down the stairs to the living room where she looks out the window; she bleeds all over the carpet and her skirt then calls the ambulance.

At the hospital, Frank is worried and crying while Shep comforts him. He talks about broken capillaries and other stuff the doctor told him that he couldn't understand. He finishes with, "she did it to her herself". Shep leaves to get coffee and he cries at the vending machine and when he returns he gets the news that April did not make it because she bled out too much even before the ambulance got to her.

Frank runs down the street.

The next scene we see Milly and Shep with a new couple in their house and they are sharing this tragic story of the Wheelers. Milly mentions that Frank moved back into the city with the kids and he was the most devoted father there is, spending all his time with his kids. Shep walks out to the backyard and Milly follows suit. Shep tells Milly that he no longer wants to talk about the Wheelers and she says okay. They hug and kiss and walk back inside the house.

We see a scene of Frank sitting on a park bench watching his children on the swings. Frank just smiles when the kids call him, but he seemed very regretful.

In the final scene Mrs. Givings is sitting on the couch talking to her husband Howard (Richard Easton). She talks about the neighborhood and what it has become. When Howard mentions the Wheelers, Mrs. Givings goes on and on about how crazy and dysfunctional they were despite their looks. As she is going on and on about it, he begins to turn down his hearing aid as it is the only way he has learned to keep himself sane from living with a woman like Mrs. Givings.

Principal cast

Development

After Richard Yates' novel was published in 1961, director John Frankenheimer considered filming it, but opted to make The Manchurian Candidate instead.[2] Samuel Goldwyn Jr., expressed an interest in making it into a film but others in his studio convinced him that it lacked commercial prospects.[3] In 1965, producer Albert Ruddy bought the rights but did not like the book's ending, and wanted to obscure April's death with "tricky camerawork".[3] He became involved in adapting The Godfather and, five years later, while a writer-in-residence at Wichita State University, Yates offered to adapt his work for the screen. Ruddy had other projects lined up at the time and demurred, eventually selling the rights to actor Patrick O'Neal. The actor loved the book and spent the rest of his life trying to finish a workable screenplay.[3] Yates read O'Neal's treatment of his novel and found it "godawful", but O'Neal refused the writer's repeated offers to buy back the rights. Yates died in 1992, O'Neal two years later.[2]

The project remained in limbo until 2001 when Todd Field expressed interest in adapting it for the screen. However, when told by the O'Neal estate he would be required to shoot O'Neal's script as written, Field stepped away from the material and opted to make Little Children instead.[4] David Thompson eventually purchased the rights for BBC Films.[5] In March 2007, BBC Films established a partnership with DreamWorks, and the rights to the film's worldwide distribution were assigned to Paramount Pictures, owner of DreamWorks. On February 14, 2008, Paramount announced that Paramount Vantage was "taking over distribution duties on Revolutionary Road".[6] The BBC hired Justin Haythe to write the screenplay because, according to the screenwriter, he was "hugely affordable".[3]

Kate Winslet sent producer Scott Rudin the script and he told her that her husband, director Sam Mendes, would be perfect to direct it.[3] She gave Mendes Yates' novel and told him, "I really want to play this part".[7] He read Haythe's script and then the book in quick succession. Haythe's first draft was very faithful to the novel, using large parts of Yates' own language, but Mendes told him to find ways to externalize what Frank and April do not say to each other.[3]

Once Leonardo DiCaprio agreed to do the film, it went almost immediately into production.[3] DiCaprio said that he saw his character as "unheroic" and "slightly cowardly" and that he was "willing to be just a product of his environment".[8] DiCaprio prepared for the role by watching several documentaries about the 1950s and the origin of suburbs. He said that the film was not meant to be a romance and that he and Winslet intentionally avoided films that show them in romantic roles since Titanic.[8] Both actors were reluctant to make films similar to Titanic because "we just knew it would be a fundamental mistake to try to repeat any of those themes".[9] To prepare for the role, Winslet read The Feminine Mystique by Betty Friedan.[10]

Mendes had the cast rehearse for three-and-a-half weeks before principal photography and shot everything in sequence and on location.[11] Actor Michael Shannon said that he did not feel that on the set of the film there were any stars, but "a group of people united by a passion for the material and wanting to honor the book".[12] He said that Winslet and DiCaprio could only make such a good performance as a couple, because they had developed a friendship since their work on Titanic. For Shannon, it was more important to prepare for the moment when he walked on the set than being concerned about the movie stars he was working with.[12] On the fight scenes between him and Winslet, DiCaprio said, "So much of what happens between Frank and April in this film is what's left unsaid. I actually found it a real joy to do those fight scenes because finally, these people were letting each other have it."[9] The shoot was so emotionally and physically exhausting for DiCaprio that he postponed his next film for two months.[11]

Mendes wanted to create a claustrophobic dynamic and shot all of the Wheeler house interiors in an actual house in Darien, Connecticut. DiCaprio remembers, "it was many months in this house and there was no escaping the environment. I think it fed into the performances."[13] They could not film in a period accurate house because it would have been too small to shoot inside.[14] Production Designer Kristi Zea is responsible for the "iconic, nostalgic images of quaint Americana", although she says that was "absolutely the antithesis of what we wanted to do".[14] Zea chose for the set of this film furnishings that "that middle-class America would be buying at that time".[14]

During the post-production phase, Mendes cut 18 scenes, or 20 minutes to achieve a less literal version that he saw as more in the spirit of Yates' novel.[3]

Reaction

Revolutionary Road had a limited release in the United States at three theaters on December 26, 2008, and a wide release at 1,058 theaters on January 23, 2009. Revolutionary Road has earned $22.9 million at the domestic box office and $51.7 million internationally for a worldwide total of $74.6 million.[15]

Critical reception

Revolutionary Road has received generally positive reviews from critics. It holds a 69% rating from critics on review aggregate website Rotten Tomatoes, based on 190 reviews, with the consensus being "Brilliantly acted and emotionally powerful, Revolutionary Road is a handsome adaptation of Richard Yates' celebrated novel".[16] Metacritic lists it with a 69 out of 100, which indicates "generally favorable reviews", based on 38 reviews.[17]

Kenneth Turan of the Los Angeles Times said,

It takes the skill of stars Kate Winslet and Leonardo DiCaprio and director Sam Mendes to get this film to a place where it involves and moves us — which it finally does — but it is a near thing... Justin Haythe's screenplay does many good things, but it can't escape the arch lingo of the time... and that in turn makes the film's concerns initially feel dated and outmoded as well... Encouraged by Mendes' artful direction, his gift for eliciting naturalness, the core of this film finally cries out to us today, makes us see that the notion of characters struggling with life, with the despair of betraying their best selves because of what society will or won't allow, is as gripping and relevant now as it ever was. Or ever will be.[18]

Joe Neumaier of the New York Daily News said

[the film] comes close but falls short of capturing Richard Yates' terrific novel... the movie — two-thirds Mad Men, one-third American Beauty, with a John Cheever chaser — works best when focusing on the personal. Thankfully, it's there that Mendes and screenwriter Justin Haythe catch some of Yates' weighty ideas, and where Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet succeed in doing the heavy lifting... DiCaprio, round-shouldered and sleepy-eyed, and Winslet, watchful and alert, raise up each other and everything around them. Never once shadowed by Titanic, they suggest, often wordlessly, the box the Wheelers have found themselves in. Whereas the novel is told mostly from Frank's viewpoint, the movie is just as much April's, and Winslet, whether fighting back or fighting back tears, is sensational.[19]

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave Revolutionary Road four stars out of four, commending the acting and screenplay and calling the film "so good it is devastating". He said of Winslet and DiCaprio, "[t]hey are so good, they stop being actors and become the people I grew up around."[20]

Todd McCarthy of Variety called the film "faithful, intelligent, admirably acted, superbly shot" and added, "It also offers a near-perfect case study of the ways in which film is incapable of capturing certain crucial literary qualities, in this case the very things that elevate the book from being a merely insightful study of a deteriorating marriage into a remarkable one... Even when the dramatic temperature is cranked up to high, the picture's underpinnings seem only partly present, to the point where one suspects that what it's reaching for dramatically might be all but unattainable — perhaps approachable only by Pinter at his peak."[21] McCarthy later significantly qualified his review, calling Revolutionary Road "problematic" and that it "has some issues that just won't go away".[22] He concludes that Revolutionary Road suffers in comparison to Billy Wilder's The Apartment and Richard Quine's Strangers When We Meet because of its "narrow vision", even arguing that the television series Mad Men handles the issues of conformity, frustration, and hypocrisy "with more panache and precision".[22]

David Ansen of Newsweek said the film "is lushly, impeccably mounted — perhaps too much so. Mendes, a superb stage director, has an innately theatrical style: everything pops off the screen a little bigger and bolder than life, but the effect, rather than intensifying the emotions, calls attention to itself. Instead of losing myself in the story, I often felt on the outside looking in, appreciating the craftsmanship, but one step removed from the agony on display. Revolutionary Road is impressive, but it feels like a classic encased in amber."[23]

Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly graded the film B+ and commented,

The film is lavishly dark — some might say too dark — yet I'd suggest it has a different limitation: For all its shattering domestic discord, there's something remote and aestheticized about it. April brings a private well of conflict to her middle-class prison, but Winslet is so meticulous in her telegraphed despair that she intrigues us, moves us, yet never quite touches our unguarded nerves.[24]

Kirk Honeycutt of The Hollywood Reporter called the film a "didactic, emotionally overblown critique of the soulless suburbs" and added, "Revolutionary Road is, essentially, a repeat for Mendes of American Beauty... Once more, the suburbs are well-upholstered nightmares and its denizens clueless — other than one estranged male. Clearly, this environment attracts the dramatic sensibilities of this theater-trained director. Everything is boldly indicated to the audience from arch acting styles to the wink-wink, nod-nod of its design. Indeed his actors play the subtext with such fury that the text virtually disappears. Subtlety is not one of Mendes' strong suits."[25]

Rex Reed of The New York Observer called the film "a flawless, moment-to-moment autopsy of a marriage on the rocks and an indictment of the American Dream gone sour" and "a profound, intelligent and deeply heartfelt work that raises the bar of filmmaking to exhilarating."[26]

Peter Travers of Rolling Stone called the film "raw and riveting" and commented, "Directed with extraordinary skill by Sam Mendes, who warms the chill in the Yates-faithful script by Justin Haythe, the film is a tough road well worth traveling . . . DiCaprio is in peak form, bringing layers of buried emotion to a defeated man. And the glorious Winslet defines what makes an actress great, blazing commitment to a character and the range to make every nuance felt."[27]

Mick LaSalle of the San Francisco Chronicle voted the film as his best of 2008. He commented, "Finally, this is a movie that can and should be seen more than once. Watch it one time through her eyes. Watch it again through his eyes. It works both ways. It works in every way. This is a great American film."[28]

Top ten lists

The film appeared on several critics' top ten lists of the best films of 2008.[29]

Awards and nominations

  • By missing out on an Academy Award nomination, Kate Winslet became only the second actress to win the Golden Globe for Best Lead Actress in a Drama without receiving a nomination for the Academy Award for Best Actress for the same role. Due to the difference in rules between the Golden Globes and Academy Awards, Winslet's performance in The Reader was considered a leading one by The Academy, despite winning the Golden Globe for Best Supporting Actress for the same performance. According to Academy rules, an actor or actress may receive only one nomination in a single category. Due to Winslet's performance in The Reader being nominated, her performance in this film became ineligible.
Awards
AwardCategoryRecipient(s)Outcome
Academy AwardsBest Art DirectionDebra Schutt and Kristi Zeanominated
Best Costume DesignAlbert Wolskynominated
Best Supporting ActorMichael Shannonnominated
BAFTA AwardsBest ActressKate Winsletnominated
Best Costume DesignAlbert Wolskynominated
Best Production DesignDebra Schutt and Kristi Zeanominated
Best Screenplay – AdaptedJustin Haythenominated
Costume Designers GuildExcellence in Period Costume DesignAlbert Wolskynominated
Golden Globe AwardsBest Motion Picture – Dramanominated
Best Actor – Motion Picture DramaLeonardo DiCaprionominated
Best Actress – Motion Picture DramaKate Winsletwon
Best Director – Motion PictureSam Mendesnominated
Screen Actors GuildOutstanding Performance by a Female Actor in a Leading Role – Motion PictureKate Winsletnominated
Satellite AwardsTop 10 Films of 2008won
Best Art Direction and Production DesignKristi Zea, Teresa Carriker-Thayer, John Kasarda, and Nicholas Lundynominated
Best Film – Dramanominated
Best Actor – Motion Picture DramaLeonardo DiCaprionominated
Best Screenplay – AdaptedJustin Haythenominated
Best Supporting Actor – Motion PictureMichael Shannonwon
St. Louis Gateway Film Critics AssociationBest ActressKate Winsletwon
Vancouver Film Critics CircleBest ActressKate Winslet
(for Revolutionary Road and The Reader)
won

DVD Release

Revolutionary Road was released in the Region 1 (US and Canada) area on June 2, 2009. Entertainment Weekly gave the DVD an "A-" rating and felt that director Sam Mendes gave an "insightful" audio commentary.[30]

The DVD includes deleted scenes which give more depth in clarity to the theme and the characters. They include a flashback of April's to the time when the couple decides to buy the house on Revolutionary Road. The scene shows a pregnant April and Frank being very loving towards each other. They stand for the first time in front of the picture window and April comments that "there's no escaping the picture window." Frank comments that one picture window won't ruin their personalities. This is the same window she stands in front of after the abortion in the final scene and, as the director puts it, becomes a symbol of her entrapment. Another scene shows April mowing the lawn the morning after their fight on the side of the road. Frank comes out and says she doesn't need to mow the lawn and then gives a halfway sincere apology about last night, but April isn't fully willing to accept it. Another scene shows Frank riding the train to work and having a flashback to his childhood and riding on the train with his father to his work. His father comments that he's going to be a big shot now. Another scene shows Frank and April at Shep's house with him and his wife having drinks. Frank comments that tomorrow is going to be his 30th birthday. He then recalls a story of being in the war where he loses all track of the date and while everyone is laying down to sleep he remembers that it's his birthday. Everyone in his battalion sings him Happy Birthday. April looks at him with pity and when Frank asks her why she says that he told that story last year. In the final deleted scene Frank is shown running into the house after he finds out April has died. It is night time and he goes upstairs and discovers the bathtub where the abortion is shown although the actual bathtub is not shown. Shep then comes in the house and calls his name and begins looking for him, but Frank hides behind the door and isn't discovered. Shep leaves and Frank wanders downstairs and discovers a note from April on the table. It reads, "Whatever happens, don't blame yourself. I love you." Frank reads it and begins to cry.

Trivia

  • As earlier stated, the film stars Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, and Kathy Bates who were all cast together in the 1997 film, Titanic.

References

  1. ^ Revolutionary Road Box Office Mojo
  2. ^ a b Bailey, Blake (June 26, 2007). "Revolutionary Road—The Movie". Slate. http://www.slate.com/id/2169033/. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h McGrath, Charles (December 14, 2008). "Kate! Leo! Gloom! Doom! Can It Work?". The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2008/12/14/movies/14mcgr.html?_r=1&ref=arts. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  4. ^ "Trivia." Revolutionary Road at IMBD.com.
  5. ^ McClintock, Pamela (March 22, 2007). "DiCaprio, Winslet to Star in Road". Variety. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117961661.html?categoryid=13&cs=1. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  6. ^ "New Dates for Eight Under Par". The Hollywood Reporter. February 14, 2008. http://www.variety.com/article/VR1117961661.html?categoryid=13&cs=1. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  7. ^ Knegt, Peter (December 22, 2008). "Plumbing the Depths of Revolutionary Road: Sam Mendes on Yates, Kate, and the Pressures of Awards". indieWIRE. http://www.indiewire.com/article/plumbing_the_depths_of_revolutionary_road_sam_mendes_on_yates_kate_and_the_/. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  8. ^ a b Guzman, Rafer (January 19, 2009). "In Revolutionary Road, Leo DiCaprio just an ordinary guy". Slate. http://www.pantagraph.com/articles/2009/01/13/freetime/doc495e5291d4cc4738928405.txt. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  9. ^ a b Wong, Grace (January 23, 2009). "DiCaprio reveals joys of fighting with Winslet". CNN. http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/Movies/01/23/kate.leo/index.html?section=cnn_latest. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  10. ^ Cochrane, Kira (December 19, 2008). ""I did have moments where I'd say, Oh my God ..."". The Guardian. http://www.guardian.co.uk/film/2008/dec/19/kate-winslet-film-the-reader-revolutionary-road. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  11. ^ a b Wood, Gaby (December 14, 2008). "How Sam became The Man". The Observer. http://www.observer.com/2008/o2/can-love-survive?page=all. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  12. ^ a b Copley, Rich (January 22, 2009). "Michael Shannon's small part in Revolutionary Road made a big impact". The State. http://www.thestate.com/movies/story/659963.html?RSS=life_and_style. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  13. ^ Masterson, Lawrie (January 11, 2009). "Leonardo DiCaprio's Hard Road". Herald Sun. 
  14. ^ a b c Hillis, Aaron (January 6, 2009). "Revolutionary Road - Evoke an era of suburban life without overdoing it". Variety. http://www.variety.com/index.asp?layout=print_story&articleid=VR1117998049&categoryid=3247. Retrieved 2009-05-27. 
  15. ^ "Revolutionary Road". Box Office Mojo. http://www.boxofficemojo.com/movies/?id=revolutionaryroad.htm. Retrieved 2009-05-24. 
  16. ^ "Revolutionary Road Movie Reviews, Pictures". Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment. http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/revolutionary_road/. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  17. ^ "Revolutionary Road (2008): Reviews". Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/titles/revolutionaryroad. Retrieved 2009-01-27. 
  18. ^ Turan, Kenneth. "'Revolutionary Road': Strong Performances Steer This 1950s Marital Drama Out of a Period-Picture Trap." Los Angeles Times. December 26, 2008.
  19. ^ Neumaier, Joe. "Revolutionary Road: Beauty is in the Details of Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet's Reunion Movie 'Revolutionary Road'." New York Daily News. December 24, 2008.
  20. ^ Roger Ebert (2008-12-30). "Revolutionary Road (R)". rogerebert.com. http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081230/REVIEWS/812309997. Retrieved 2009-01-23. 
  21. ^ McCarthy, Todd. "Revolutionary Road." Variety. November 17, 2008.
  22. ^ a b McCarthy, Todd. "'50s Melodrama Hard to Capture on Film," Variety. January 8, 2009.
  23. ^ Ansen, David. "Revolutionary Road." Newsweek. November 28, 2008.
  24. ^ Gleiberman, Owen. "Revolutionary Road." Entertainment Weekly. November 28, 2008.
  25. ^ Honeycutt, Kirk. "Film Review: Revolutionary Road." The Hollywood Reporter. November 17, 2008.
  26. ^ Reed, Rex. "Love Asunder." New York Observer. December 16, 2008.
  27. ^ Travers, Peter. "Revolutionary Road." Rolling Stone. December 25, 2008.
  28. ^ LaSalle, Mick. "Movie Review: 'Revolutionary Road' Year's Best." San Francisco Chronicle. January 2, 2009.
  29. ^ a b c d e f g h "Metacritic: 2008 Film Critic Top Ten Lists". Metacritic. http://www.metacritic.com/film/awards/2008/toptens.shtml. Retrieved January 11, 2009. 
  30. ^ Nashawaty, Chris (May 27, 2009). "Revolutionary Road". Entertainment Weekly. http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20281259,00.html. Retrieved 2009-07-16. 

External links

 

Toutes les traductions de Revolutionary_Road_(film)


Contenu de sensagent

  • définitions
  • synonymes
  • antonymes
  • encyclopédie

  • definition
  • synonym

Dictionnaire et traducteur pour mobile

⇨ Nouveau : sensagent est maintenant disponible sur votre mobile

   Publicité ▼

sensagent's office

Raccourcis et gadgets. Gratuit.

* Raccourci Windows : sensagent.

* Widget Vista : sensagent.

dictionnaire et traducteur pour sites web

Alexandria

Une fenêtre (pop-into) d'information (contenu principal de Sensagent) est invoquée un double-clic sur n'importe quel mot de votre page web. LA fenêtre fournit des explications et des traductions contextuelles, c'est-à-dire sans obliger votre visiteur à quitter votre page web !

Essayer ici, télécharger le code;

SensagentBox

Avec la boîte de recherches Sensagent, les visiteurs de votre site peuvent également accéder à une information de référence pertinente parmi plus de 5 millions de pages web indexées sur Sensagent.com. Vous pouvez Choisir la taille qui convient le mieux à votre site et adapter la charte graphique.

Solution commerce électronique

Augmenter le contenu de votre site

Ajouter de nouveaux contenus Add à votre site depuis Sensagent par XML.

Parcourir les produits et les annonces

Obtenir des informations en XML pour filtrer le meilleur contenu.

Indexer des images et définir des méta-données

Fixer la signification de chaque méta-donnée (multilingue).


Renseignements suite à un email de description de votre projet.

Jeux de lettres

Les jeux de lettre français sont :
○   Anagrammes
○   jokers, mots-croisés
○   Lettris
○   Boggle.

Lettris

Lettris est un jeu de lettres gravitationnelles proche de Tetris. Chaque lettre qui apparaît descend ; il faut placer les lettres de telle manière que des mots se forment (gauche, droit, haut et bas) et que de la place soit libérée.

boggle

Il s'agit en 3 minutes de trouver le plus grand nombre de mots possibles de trois lettres et plus dans une grille de 16 lettres. Il est aussi possible de jouer avec la grille de 25 cases. Les lettres doivent être adjacentes et les mots les plus longs sont les meilleurs. Participer au concours et enregistrer votre nom dans la liste de meilleurs joueurs ! Jouer

Dictionnaire de la langue française
Principales Références

La plupart des définitions du français sont proposées par SenseGates et comportent un approfondissement avec Littré et plusieurs auteurs techniques spécialisés.
Le dictionnaire des synonymes est surtout dérivé du dictionnaire intégral (TID).
L'encyclopédie française bénéficie de la licence Wikipedia (GNU).

Copyright

Les jeux de lettres anagramme, mot-croisé, joker, Lettris et Boggle sont proposés par Memodata.
Le service web Alexandria est motorisé par Memodata pour faciliter les recherches sur Ebay.
La SensagentBox est offerte par sensAgent.

Traduction

Changer la langue cible pour obtenir des traductions.
Astuce: parcourir les champs sémantiques du dictionnaire analogique en plusieurs langues pour mieux apprendre avec sensagent.

Dernières recherches dans le dictionnaire :

3922 visiteurs en ligne

calculé en 0,125s

   Publicité ▼

Je voudrais signaler :
section :
une faute d'orthographe ou de grammaire
un contenu abusif (raciste, pornographique, diffamatoire)
une violation de copyright
une erreur
un manque
autre
merci de préciser :

Mon compte

connexion

inscription

   Publicité ▼